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that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went out and you asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obamacare? most would say no, but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm still going to try to make them better and a guy he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of middle class americans and in the end, people decided to stick with the devil they knew rather than the one they didn't. >> paul: so the election, the republican defeat was big, but it wasn't overwhelming in a sense of repudiation, kim, as far as a republican platform and their agenda? >> no, i think the reason, look, this country had the opportunity in this election to once again hand completely controlled government to democrats. everyone in the house was up fo
stories of 2012 and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the re-election of president barack obama, politics on the national level headed in a decidedly liberal direction. so what happened? and what does it mean for the country going forward? joining the panel this week, "wall streetf journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to supp
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)